The World's Best Selling Stemware Pattern

Synonymous with luxury living, the Waterford Crystal Lismore pattern has been the number-one selling crystal stemware pattern for more than 60 years.

Waterford Crystal designer Miroslav Havel created the Lismore pattern in 1952. Influenced by the 18th century crystal designs of Waterford founders George and William Penrose, the pattern features refined diamond cuts and a symmetrical series of upward flowing wedge cuts. The clarity of the crystal combined with the refraction of light through the cutting created what the world now treasures – the enduring allure of Lismore.

Classic Lismore has been embraced by devotees of taste and luxury living for more than six decades. Waterford designers continue explore new avenues and approaches to the signature Lismore look, expanding the Lismore collection to include an entire galaxy of bowls, barware, tableware, clocks, frames, lighting, vases and vanity items.

A Look Back at 1952

What else was happening in the world as Waterford designer Miroslav Havel was crafting his iconic crystal pattern?

England’s King George VI dies February 1952. Daughter Elizabeth ascends the throne as Queen Elizabeth II.

Citizens of the United States elect former General Dwight D. Eisenhower in November as the 34th President.

The VI Winter Olympic Games in Oslo Norway begin February 14 with 30 nations participating. Opening ceremonies for the XV Olympiad are held in Helsinki, July 19, with first-time appearances by Israel and the USSR.

The literary world welcomed 1952 #1 Best-Sellers "The Caine Mutiny" by Herman Wouk in January, "The Silver Chalice" by Thomas B. Costain in September, and "East of Eden" by John Steinbeck in November.

Audiences flock to the silver screen to see 1952 Academy Award winners "The Greatest Show on Earth," "High Noon," and "Come Back Little Sheba." On the small screen, families crowded around the television to laugh along with the Milton Berle’s Texaco Star Theatre, I Love Lucy and The Red Skelton Show.